Tag Archives: configuration

Neat little thing, or bash tab-completion for your tools

You know that thing, the magic of having all the options listed in front of you when you [double-]press Tab after typing something on the console? Or the unique option completing itself if there’s a match? Of course you do. One thing that bothered me is the frustration of when it’s suddenly not there.

For general tools it’s already alright, they either come bundled with tab-completion or you can easily set it up – for instance, there’s a setup tutorial for Mac, coming with a Git bundle. One important note on that one: in iTerm, you have to go to settings -> Profiles and change Command to /opt/local/bin/bash -I for your/default profile to run proper bash version.

But then there are your own little tools that start as a one-parameter two-liner but eventually grow to 30-params fire-breathing hydra. And that’s when you start missing that tab-completion thing.

But that’s easy (for simple cases – see a note below) – you just create a script named, say, mycomplete.bash, containing something like this:

_completecmd()
{
  local complist=`fdisk 2>&1|grep -Eo ‘^ +[a-z]+’|tr ‘\n’ ‘ ‘`
  local cur=${COMP_WORDS[COMP_CWORD]}
  COMPREPLY=( $(compgen -W “$complist” — $cur) )
}
complete -F _completecmd yourcmd

where _compelecmd is a unique function name, yourcmd is a command this should be applied to, and complist is constructed from fdisk output just to illustrate the approach – it should be output of yourcmd parsed there. Note: try your parser before you set it up, I faced weird differences on different platforms.

Then you need to add this to your ~/.bashrc:

source /path/to/mycomplete.bash

and you’re done. To have it right away, you can also run source /path/to/mycomplete.bash directly in your bash prompt.

Mind that that this approach wouldn’t work for intricate cases when you have a deep parameter sequence dependency – have a look at Git approach, it’s a bloody burning hell there.

Git hooks

Git hooks are lovely. Consider automated syntax check before committing changes:

  • git config –global init.templatedir ‘~/.git-templates’
  • mkdir -p ~/.git-templates/hooks
  • vi ~/git-pre-commit-hook.sh and put, for instance, following:


#!/bin/bash

  retcode=0
  for f in $( git diff --cached --name-status|awk '$1 != "R" { print $2 }' ); do
    echo "Veryfying $f..."
    filename=$(basename "$f")
    extension="${filename##*.}"
    if [ "$extension" = "pl" ] || [ "$extension" = "pm" ]; then
      perl -c $f
      lineretcode=$?
      if [ $lineretcode != 0 ]; then
        retcode=$lineretcode
      fi
    fi
  done

  if [ $retcode != 0 ]; then
    echo
    echo "Pre-commit validation failed. Please fix issues or run 'git commit --no-verify' if you're certain in skipping validation step."
    exit 1
  fi

  exit 0

  • chmod a+x ~/git-pre-commit-hook.sh
  • ln -sn ~/git-pre-commit-hook.sh ~/.git-templates/hooks/pre-commit (point of this to have it centralised – on next step global template is copied to repository, so if it’s a symlink – it’s easier to adjust for all later)
  • cd to your repository and run git init there – it’d re-instantiate the repository with copying global hook templates there

That’s it – now you have yourself neat little safeguard. There are better techniques of course – flymake, for one, or some IDE build/check configuration. That works, too – but gets too tricky when you have to patch the code on remote instances. In my case, I have to edit files remotely – and while Emacs has no problem with that (Sublime has plugin for that, too, and you can always add some fuse SSH mount), my flymake settings suck, and I’m not keen to dive into a bloodthirsty piragna pool of its remote execution configuration.

So… git hooks it is.

Basic DNS records list

This is a “you learn better when you write it down” sort of post. Never actually got into DNS record types – as a lot of things I’ve missed, there was just no need and I wasn’t curious enough. Although curiosity without regular application of that knowledge is rather pointless – “you soon will forget the tune that you play”, if you play it just once or twice.

That said, I’m gonna be needing this knowledge soon (I presume), so I thought I better do me a hint page (a “crib sheet”, as the dictionary suggests).

  •  A record – “Address”, a connection of a name to an IP address like, for instance, “example.com. IN A 69.9.64.10” – where IN is for the Internet, i.e. “Internet Address…” Wildcards could be used for “all subdomains”
  • AAAA – “four times the size”, A-address for IPV6 addresses (see a note on IPV6 below)
  • CNAME – Canonical Name, specifies an alias for existing A record, like “subdomain.example.com CNAME example.com“. Useful to make sure you only have one IP address in A record, and others rely on A name – so if IP changes, it’s one place you have to change it at. Note: do not use CNAME aliases in MX records.
  • MX – Mail eXchange, specifies which server serves zone’s mail exchange purposes – like, for instance, “mydomain.com IN MX 0 mydomain.com.“; final dot is important, 0 is for priority: ther could be multiple MX records for the zone, and they processed in priority order (the lower the number the higher the priority). Same-priority records are processes in random order. Right-side name should be an A record.
  • PTR – specify pointer for a reverse DNS lookup, required to validate hostname identity in some cases – “16.3.0.122.in-addr.arpa. IN PTR name.net” (note that IP of name.net is 122.0.3.16)
  • NS – Name Server, specifies a (list of) authoritative DNS server for the domain, for instance: “example.com. IN NS ns1.live.secure.com“. This should be specified at authoritative server as well.
  • SOA – State Of Authority, an important record with zone’s name server details – “authoritative information about an Internet domain, the email of the domain administrator, the domain serial number, and several timers relating to refreshing the zone“. Example:  mydomain.com. 14400 IN SOA ns.mynameserver.com. root.ns.mynameserver.com. (
    2004123001 ; Serial number
    86000 ; Refresh rate in seconds
    7200 ; Update Retry in seconds
    3600000 ; Expiry in seconds
    600 ; minimum in seconds )
  • SRV – an option to specify a server for a Service, like “_http._tcp.example.com. IN SRV 0 5 80 www.example.com.” – here’s the service name (_http), priority (0), weight (5) for services with the same priority, and port (80) for the service.
  • NAPTR – recent and complex regexp-based name resolution I’m not keen to into.
  • There’s MUCH MORE of this crap, hope I won’t need to ever dig that deep
  • There’s also a number of decentralized DNS initiatives

Oh, and on IPV6:

  • it’s 128-bit (IPV4 is 32)
  • it’s recorded in hex numbers, 8 quads
  • it has following structure:
2001:0db8:3c4d:0015:0000:0000:abcd:ef12
______________|____|___________________
global prefix subnet  Interface ID
  • local address is 0000:0000:0000:0000:0000:0000:0000:0001
  • and IPV4 record in that case would look like 0000:0000:0000:0000:0000:0000:192.168.1.25
  • zeroes could be omitted: ::1 or ::192.168.1.25
  • to make sure address is shortened correctly, use ipv6calc util: ipv6calc –in ipv6addr –out ipv6addr –printuncompressed ::1

Disable OSX Mail app from popping up on calendar events

As (I believe) many OSX fellas, I connect my Google calendar with OSX calendar to receive all the notification in pop-up form – and just to have all the event a tap away. However when event reminder fires, OSX Mail app starts jumping in anxiety, yelling “Oh! Oh! You forgot to add your email! Do it, do it now!” – and that’s annoying because, well, I don’t use that app and I have no intention to.

The solution is simple (for a downside, read on):

sudo chmod 000 /Applications/Mail.app/Contents/MacOS/Mail

that’d just disable Mail app from being able to launch. It’s dirty, yes – but it’s that famous “good enough” kung-fu. If you need to get Mail app back to launchable state, well, just undo the spell with 755 permissions.

Now on that downside: you have to do this with each system update, because either app access rules or file itself get restored on update – that’s how I got to writing this, because I faced the problem again after an update. How to cope with it? Well, just do it again – updates are seldom enough. That’s how I’m gonna deal with it anyway.